NC State Refugee Plan 2015

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

SECTION I: ADMINISTRATION

A. DESIGNATIONS OF AUTHORITY

1. Responsible State Agency

The Division of Social Services (DSS) within the NC Department of Health and Human Services (NC

DHHS) is the State Agency in North Carolina with authority and responsibility for the State’s program of

assistance and services under Title IV of the Immigration and Nationality Act. Within the Division, the

Director has designated the Economic and Family Services (EFS) Section as the administering agency for

the Refugee Assistance Programs. As such, the State Refugee Office (SRO) within DSS has responsibility

for program planning; development of program policy and standards; contracting; fiscal management and

accountability; program monitoring, reporting and evaluation; and for assuring that needed services are

developed within state and federal laws, regulations and policies.

The functions of the NC State Refugee program administration are carried out by Division staff located at

820 S. Boylan Avenue, Raleigh, NC 27603. Budget and other administrative functions such as contracting

are also located there.

North Carolina has a county-administered/state supervised social welfare system. Therefore, applications for

cash assistance (RCA) and medical assistance (RMA) are made to and processed by the county department

of social services (dss) in the county where the refugee resides. The delivery of services under the program

is by the county departments of social services and/or refugee-specific provider agencies under purchase of

service contracts with the NC Refugee Office.

2. Refugee State Coordinator

The position of State Refugee Coordinator (SRC) is assigned to the Economic and Family Services Section

within the Division of Social Services. The person holding this position is Ms. Marlene S. Myers. She

carries responsibility and authority for administering and supervising the refugee plan, and effecting

maximum coordination between public and private providers involved in refugee resettlement and social

services leading to self-sufficiency. Responsibility for overall direction, policy development and

implementation and general oversight of social services under the state’s Refugee Services Program lies

with the State Refugee Coordinator, who also assures the implementation of the refugee cash and medical

assistance programs. The SRC is supervised by the Acting Chief of the Economic and Family Services

Section, Mr. David Locklear.

The SRC works closely with other state staff. Assisting Ms. Myers are three permanent Refugee Social

Services Program Consultants (one, Gail Andersen, oversees public benefits) and two (Lynne Little and Pat

Priest) oversee contracts with refugee social services, targeted assistance and discretionary grants. A fourth

consultant is employed on a contract basis through Temporary Solutions whose primary responsibilities

include data collection and analysis for the purpose of reports, as well as oversight of Refugee Information

System (RIS) database which moved to a web-based application in March, 2014. Contract and other

administrative assistance is available through the services of Administrative Assistant, Joan Otto who

functions as the RAP Contract Administrator.

The SRC coordinates on a regular basis with the State Refugee Health Coordinator who is housed in the

Division of Public Health of the NC DHHS. In August, 2014 the expenses related to the salary and

administrative cost of the Refugee Medical Screening became part of the RAP Cash and Medical funding

rather than through ORR’s Preventive Health Grant. The NC State Refugee Health Coordinator is Mrs.

Jennifer Morillo.

1*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

B. ORGANIZATION

As mentioned above, the Governor of the State of North Carolina designated the NC Department of Health

and Human Services responsibility for administering the refugee program. Furthermore, the Secretary of

DHHS delegated this responsibility to the Division of Social Services. The Secretary of NC DHHS is

Aldona Z. Wos, M.D. and Director of the NC Division of Social Services is Mr. Wayne Black.

A number of units within State government lend support to the Refugee Services Program. Fiscal support

functions are the responsibility of the DHHS Office of State Controller. Controller office staff is

responsible for handling Office of Refugee Resettlement funds and Federal Expenditure reports. They are

also primarily responsible for making budget projections for the state’s services and assistance programs

under ORR and for making quarterly request for funds. Within the General Accounting Section are staff

members that are responsible for processing monthly expenditure reports from refugee contract providers.

Reports from the refugee service providers include their reimbursement claims for costs of administration as

well as costs of providing services to refugees.

The NC DSS Contracts Unit headed by Carlotta Dixon is responsible for developing and implementing

financial assistance contract policy and procedures. This Unit is responsible for processing and executing

contracts, contract and budget amendments, and for providing information to Section Contract

Administrators regarding general contract responsibilities, such as record retention and travel policy. The

NC DSS Budget Section establishes the budget and reviews awards, contracts and expenditures for the RAP

programs.

C. ASSURANCES

1. Program Compliance

The state will comply with the provisions of Title IV of the Immigration and Nationality Act, official

issuances of the Director of the Office of Refugee Resettlement, DHHS. North Carolina will meet the

requirements of 45 Part 400 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) as well as comply with all other

applicable Federal statutes and regulations in effect during the time that it is participating in the refugee

program and receiving grant funding. North Carolina will amend this plan as necessary to comply with

standards, goals, and priorities established by the Director of ORR.

2. Equal Rights

Assistance and services funded under this Plan will be provided to refugees without regard to race, religion,

nationality, sex, or political opinion.

3. State Advisory Council

The North Carolina Refugee Advisory Council (NCRAC) meets approximately six times a year, usually

every other month on the fourth Wednesday. The Council consists of representatives of mutual aide

associations, local agency affiliates for national voluntary resettlement organizations, local government

agencies such as the county department of social services and county health department, community

colleges (providers of ESL), service providers (both public and private) who work with refugees, as well as

refugees themselves. The State Refugee Office also coordinates three sub-committees which convene

separately at a time and location decided by the committee members. Sub-groups include: Employment and

Vocational Training and Immigration and Naturalization. Additional NC State Refugee Office meetings are

occasionally held for special purposes such as grant planning, special issues of concern for elderly, and

2*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

development of the annual goal plan. Finally, the NC State Refugee Office also helps plan and support

special statewide events, such as World Refugee Day celebrations or cultural/community events.

Agencies invited to work with the SRC and Council on items of concern for refuges (which relate to their

respective agency) include NC State government agencies such as the Departments of: (a.) Community

Colleges; (b.) the DOC Division of Employment Security; (c.) Public Instruction; (d.) the Social Security

Administration; and (e.) Transportation’s Division of Motor Vehicles. In addition, DHHS Divisions that are

invited to participate include: (a.) Aging and Adult Services; (b.) Medical Assistance; (c.) Mental Health,

Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services; (d.) Public Health; and (e.) Vocational

Rehabilitation. Other state and local government agencies will be called upon to provide consultation and

assistance in their area of responsibility as needed. All local agencies such as the county departments of

health and social services, schools, etc. as well as others who may be affected by the arrival of refugees are

expected to be consulted about the arrival of refugees in the community. Planning with these agencies is

important to ensure successful refugee resettlement and to minimize any potential negative impact within

the community.

4. Mediation/Conciliation Procedures

For refugee cash or medical assistance, North Carolina will use the same procedures for

mediation/conciliation as those used in the TANF (called Work First in NC) and Medicaid programs.

Appeals from program recipients of the Refugee Assistance Program (RAP) will be heard by the NC State

Refugee Office if satisfactory resolution cannot be made with the local refugee service provider.

5. Notice and hearings

North Carolina will adhere to the notice and hearings standards and procedures set forth in 45 CFR §400.54.

SECTION II. ASSISTANCE AND SERVICES

A. ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

A. ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

The NC State Refugee Office (SRO) ensures coordination and appropriate use of assistance programs and

support services to encourage effective refugee resettlement and to promote economic self-sufficiency by

consultation, training, and planning with the public assistance staff and services staff of both the public and

private agencies.

1. Refugee Cash Assistance1

The SRO issues policy, provides consultation and training, and monitors the records to establish that county

departments of social services are correctly applying Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA) policy. The State of

North Carolina has chosen to administer the NC RCA program as a publicly administered RCA

program consistent with the provisions of our State’s TANF program in regard to: (1.) The determination

of initial and on-going eligibility (treatment of income and resources, budgeting methods, need standard);

(2.) The determination of benefit amounts (payment levels based on size of the assistance unit, income

disregards); and (3.) Proration of shelter, utilities, and similar needs. TANF work requirements will not

apply to RCA applicants or recipients.

1 For FFY 2013, the NC SRO is requesting $1,228,160 for the Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA) Program, as noted in the FFY

2013 ORR-1 “Cash and Medical Assistance Program Estimates” Form.

3*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

In order for a person to be eligible for refugee cash assistance he/she must be:

 One of the recognized statuses as defined in 45 CFR §400.43 or are the dependent children of, and part

of the same family unit as, individuals who meet the requirements;

 Within 8 months of initial date of entry into the United States;

 In financial/medical need according to the public assistance standard for TANF, called Work First in

North Carolina;

 Unable to meet the categorical eligibility requirements for TANF, SSI, OAA, AB, APTD,

and AABD;

 Not enrolled as full-time students in institutions of higher education;

 Not for the purpose of receiving assistance, found to have voluntarily quit or refused to apply for or

accept an appropriate offer of employment during 30 days prior to the receipt of aid;

 Not found to have voluntarily quit for the purposes of continuing eligibility or refused to apply for or

accept an appropriate offer of employment or employment-related training.

Other provisions for RCA include: Income available to the refugee on the date of application will be the

basis for determining eligibility and assistance will begin the month in which refugee applies for cash

assistance so long as the person is within eight months of arrival in country.

The state will adhere to federal regulations applicable to publicly administered programs as contained in 45

CFR Part 400 – Refugee Resettlement Program. Refugees receiving cash assistance have a family self-

sufficiency plan developed for the purpose of enabling the family to become self-supporting through the

employment of one or more family members. This may be done by county department of social services

staff person or the refugee service provider providing employment services. Within 30 days, non-exempt

refugees who are aid recipients are enrolled in an employment services program. In counties where most

refugees are resettled, refugee service providers provide employment services. The refugee service provider

and county dss communicate regularly regarding the employment status of the refugee. In counties where

there is not a refugee employment service provider, the work registration referral is made to the local

Employment Security Commission office.

As allowed in 45 CFR §400.76, North Carolina chooses to allow employment exemptions to any

employable adult who is:

1.) Under the age of 18 and still a minor dependent in school full time;

2.) Age 65 or older;

3.) A parent or other relative who is caring for a child age 24 months or younger;

4.) Ill or incapacitated; or

5.) Required to remain in the home to care for another member of the household who is ill or

incapacitated.

The state adheres to all regulations in 45 CFR §400 (Refugee Resettlement Programs) and 45 CFR §401

(Cuban/Haitian Entrant Programs), as it pertains to criteria for appropriate employability services and

employment. For example, no refugee is placed in a work site, which is in violation of applicable Federal,

State, or local health and safety standards. Failure or refusal to accept employability services or employment

results in termination of cash assistance or sanctioning, in accordance with 45 CFR §400.82. A conciliation

period and fair hearings are provided to refugees, as outlined in 45 CFR §400.83.

As previously mentioned, applications for cash assistance are made to and processed by any of the 100

county departments of social services in the county where the refugee resides. Not every refugee or asylee

resides in a county that has a refugee-specific service provider. Obviously, where a refugee-specific

employment service provider operates within the county, then the county dss refers the refugee to that

agency for employment services. If a refugee-specific employment service provider is not available, then the

4*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

county dss worker enrolls employable refugees in an appropriate mainstream employment program that is

available to RCA cash assistance recipients.

The following will not be counted as income and resources for RCA eligibility:

1.) A refugee’s resources remaining in the applicant’s country of origin;

2.) A sponsor’s income and resources to be accessible to a refugee solely because the person is serving

as a sponsor;

3.) Any cash grant received by the applicant under the Department of State or Department of Justice’s

Reception and Placement program.

The county department of social services will promptly notify the local resettlement agency when a refugee

applies for RCA in accordance with 400.68(a). Prior to approval of RCA, the local department of social

services will contact the local resettlement agency/sponsor or refugee employment provider concerning

offers of employment and inquire whether the applicant has voluntarily quit employment or has refused to

accept an offer of employment within 30 consecutive days immediately prior to the date of application, in

accordance with 45 CFR §400.77(a) of this part. Employment-service providers, whether refugee-specific or

mainstream, will notify the local department of social services when a refugee has been placed in

employment or refuses to participate in employment services in order to ensure enforcement of appropriate

action regarding benefits.

ORR Cash Assistance Requirements

The state will adhere to federal regulations applicable to publicly administered programs as contained in 45

CFR Part 400 – Refugee Resettlement Program. Refugees receiving cash assistance have a family self-

sufficiency plan developed for the purpose of enabling the family to become self-supporting through the

employment of one or more family members. This may be done by county department of social services

staff person or the refugee service provider providing employment services. Within 30 days, non-exempt

refugees who are aid recipients are enrolled in an employment services program. In counties where most

refugees are resettled, refugee service providers provide employment services. The refugee service provider

and county dss communicate regularly regarding the employment status of the refugee. In counties where

there is not a refugee employment service provider, the work registration referral is made to the local

Employment Security Commission office.

As allowed in 45 CFR §400.76, North Carolina chooses to allow employment exemptions to any

employable adult who is:

6.) Under the age of 18 and still a minor dependent in school full time;

7.) Age 65 or older;

8.) A parent or other relative who is caring for a child age 24 months or younger;

9.) Ill or incapacitated; or

10.) Required to remain in the home to care for another member of the household who is ill or

incapacitated.

The state adheres to all regulations in 45 CFR §400 (Refugee Resettlement Programs) and 45 CFR §401

(Cuban/Haitian Entrant Programs), as it pertains to criteria for appropriate employability services and

employment. For example, no refugee is placed in a work site, which is in violation of applicable Federal,

State, or local health and safety standards. Failure or refusal to accept employability services or employment

results in termination of cash assistance or sanctioning, in accordance with 45 CFR §400.82. A conciliation

period and fair hearings are provided to refugees, as outlined in 45 CFR §400.83.

2. Medical Assistance and Health Screening2

5*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

a. Health Screening

The purpose of the NC Refugee Health Program is to assure the effective resettlement of newly arrived

refugees by the timely identification and treatment of any health-related barriers to resettlement and of any

health conditions of public health concern. Reimbursement is available for costs incurred if health screening

services are provided within 90 days of the refugee’s arrival in this country. As part of its RMA program,

North Carolina has requested permission from ORR to use RMA program funds for the cost of the health

screening, particularly for (1.) Refugees not eligible for NC Medicaid, (2.) Interpretation costs, and (3.) To

implement a new refugee health data system. The state of North Carolina does not have a medical program

which covers health care for indigent adults unless they fall into one of three categorically eligible groups:

(1.) Blind, (2.) Elderly, or (3.) Disabled. Income-eligible adults with dependent children and pregnant

women may receive medical coverage under Family and Children’s Medicaid; however all other refugees

that are single adults or couples without children would not be eligible for any NC Medicaid program.

Therefore, without the ability to use RMA funds for the health screening, many adult refugees would not

receive the necessary medical services outlined in the Health Screening Protocol. Eligible children receiving

Children’s Medicaid (or CHIP) would be able to obtain much of their medical screening. However, not all

refugee children qualify. Therefore, in addition to refugee adults, some children would also be excluded

from this vital activity which is essential to the refugee’s long-term self-sufficiency. Other than Medicaid

and CHIP, there are no other funding sources available within the state of North Carolina to cover the cost

of the health screening.

Health information is collected from local health departments on a quarterly basis regarding health

information from the refugee health assessment and any follow-up treatments required. Referral dates for

health conditions not followed at the health department are recorded, but information on specific follow-up

health services through private providers is not collected by the state. Local health departments are expected

to contact newly arrived refugees and schedule the health assessment within 30 days of the refugees’ arrival

in the county. Local health departments are encouraged to work closely with the local refugee resettlement

agencies to coordinate transportation and interpreter services necessary for the health assessment screening

and any follow-up required.

The NC Refugee Health Assessment includes:

 Screening and treatment for health conditions of public health concern;

 Health status evaluation and diagnosis of problems;

 Follow-up for conditions identified prior to entry in U.S.;

 Referral for any follow-up care needed; and

 Education regarding the availability of health services.

1.) Identification

Each local health department receives direct notification of new arrivals from resettlement agencies and the

state program sends health departments an additional notification along with a data collection form for each

refugee arrival. Each county health department has a designated refugee nurse liaison to coordinate services

and follow-up for refugee arrivals. Local health departments are expected to provide a refugee health

assessment on each new arrival or to refer the refugee to a health care provider in the area capable of

providing the assessment. The State Refugee Health Coordinator (SRHC) receives notification of all new

refugee arrivals and enters this information into a refugee health database. The health department is

expected to contact the new arrival and schedule an appointment for a health assessment by the time the

2 As noted in the FFY 2013 ORR-1 “Cash and Medical Assistance Program Estimates” Form, the NC SRO is requesting a total of

$4,056,000 for its Refugee Medical Assistance (RMA) program for FFY 2013 – $3,840,000 is requested for Recipient Costs, and

an additional $216,000 is requested for the Medical Screening program.

6*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

state notification arrives. In most cases, the refugee, sponsor, or local resettlement agency has already

contacted them.

2.) System for providing follow-up treatment or monitoring

Refugees with conditions of public health concern, as identified in the refugee health assessment, are

provided follow-up by the local health department within 14 days. Refugees receive immunizations and

treatment for latent TB infection as needed and appropriate. Any other medical condition needing follow up

results in an appointment with a private physician, health care provider or community clinic. Information on

the health status of the refugee including follow up services provided or referred is reported to the state

Refugee Health Program on a quarterly basis. The state refugee health database includes health information

on each refugee arrival making it possible to monitor the results of their health assessments and track receipt

of appropriate services. The health conditions of those screened in North Carolina are similar to those seen

nationally: inadequate immunizations, dental problems, parasites and tuberculosis infection are major health

concerns in this population.

3.) Core Components of the Health Screening

Core Components of the Health Screening and Physical Exam of Refugees are performed in accordance

with the requirements prescribed, as follows:

(a.) Medical history and review of health documents including: medical records, immunization

records, chest x-ray, DS-2053, DS-2054, DS-3024 or DS-3030, DS-3025, DS-3026, IOM-

SMC, IOM-PDMS, and any other individually carried documents;

(b.) Evaluation, treatment and referral as needed for Class A and B conditions reported on DOS

and IOM forms;

(c.) Physical examination: This includes: pulse rate, height, weight, and examination of skin,

eyes, mouth, throat, ears, nose, heart (including auscultation), lungs, abdomen, back,

extremities, and genitalia to assess for obvious physical abnormalities. Blood pressure

screening is also provided for refugees 5-years-of-age and older;

(d.) General assessments of orientation to place, date, and time (mental status);

(e.) Gross dental screening and gross vision/hearing evaluation appropriate for age and

educational level of refugee;

(f.) Assessment of immunization status and update: If adequate immunizations cannot be

documented, the refugee should be immunized beginning with a primary series;

(g.) TB screening: all refugees 6 months and older should be given a Mantoux test (Intermediate

strength PPD), if they have no documented evidence of a skin test equal to or greater than 10

mm. The test must be read in 2-3 days. IGRA testing may also be appropriate in place of the

skin test. Chest x-ray may be appropriate if primary testing is positive;

(h.) Hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-Hep B core total antigen screening: Screening and

follow-up is recommended for all refugees coming from endemic countries;

(i.) HIV testing;

(j.) Required lab tests: additional required tests include the following:

a.) Blood chemistry panel, Hgb electrophoresis, and CBC with differential;

b.) Urinalysis – for persons five years of age and older;

c.) Rubella titer – for sexually active females with no documented history of rubella

immunization; and

d.) Pregnancy test – when appropriate for sexually active females; or

(k.) Other Components (depending on the refugee’s history, symptoms or risk status, based on

age, gender, race, ethnicity, or country of origin), refugees receive screening for other

conditions, including: nutritional assessment, reproductive assessment, blood lead level,

newborn screening, syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, Hep C, malaria, diabetes, cancer,

cholesterol, ova and parasite, and presumptive treatment for strongyloidiasis and

schistosomiasis should be provided. Refugees are screened based on risk factors applicable

7*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

to the general population as well as any special risk factors that may relate to their country

of origin. Testing or referral for testing is provided as appropriate. Treat and/or refer as

appropriate for each abnormal health condition identified.

4.) Interpreters

Interpreters are a necessary component of the health screening. Whenever possible, interpreters are in the

clinic with the medical team and refugees. If no interpreters are available then telephonic interpretation is

secured via a language line. North Carolina is requesting $191,0003 for its RMA program mostly to cover

interpretation during the refugee health screening visits, as shown in the ORR-1 budget narrative.

5.) Data Collection

The state refugee health program monitors each health department’s quarterly report, and counties with

incomplete or missing data are contacted to ensure that all refugees receive information regarding the

availability of health services and are quickly integrated into the health care system. The state program

provides each county with a Refugee Health Assessment Protocol. The state program currently maintains a

database using EPI INFO that includes all newly-arrived refugees. In addition to the monitoring provided

by the state Refugee Health Program, the state’s TB Control Unit monitors follow-up care provided to

identified TB cases. State protocols for those health conditions are followed in providing refugee health

services.

6.) Providers of the health screening

As stated earlier, the majority (99.4%) of refugee health screenings are performed in conjunction with local

health departments. That is – they are performed in part or initiated in the local health departments. Many

health departments cannot perform the physical exam or provide primary care, so refugees must be referred

to a primary care setting. Four local health departments that receive higher numbers of refugee patients do

perform the entire refugee health screening at least for some or all refugees – Craven, Durham, Guilford and

Mecklenburg counties. Even though other counties may and do screen occasional refugee arrivals, the

primary counties receiving and screening refugees are as follows: Buncombe (Asheville), Craven (New

Bern), Durham (Durham), Forsyth (Winston-Salem), Guilford (High Point and Greensboro), Mecklenburg

(Charlotte), New Hanover (Wilmington), Orange (Chapel Hill and Carrboro), and Wake (Raleigh). For an

up-to- date listing of addresses, contacts, and activities, please contact the NC Refugee Health Coordinator.

7.) Reimbursement framework

All of these health departments bill through the NC Medicaid billing mechanism, which also bills for those

refugees on RMA. The reimbursement rate is set at the NC Medicaid rate, and so RMA mirrors Medicaid in

coverage and in rates. As the Medicaid rates are set lower than Medicare rates, it is not expected that NC

RMA costs for refugee health screening would exceed the Medicare average unit cost. The estimated

average Medicaid rate is approximately $600 and the average Medicare rate is approximately $700.

b. Refugee Medical Assistance

As with cash assistance, medical assistance applications are made at the county department of social

services. Some refugees apply only for Refugee Medical Assistance (RMA) and not RCA. North Carolina

provides the same services in the same manner and to the same extent as under the State’s Title XIX

Medicaid program as delineated in 42 CFR part 440. Each individual member of the assistance unit is

assessed separately for eligibility for medical assistance. Determination of eligibility for Medicaid and

SCHIP occurs first and when the applicant qualifies for the state’s Medicaid or CHIP program they are

3 This is a portion of the $216,000 Budget Request for the Medical Screening component of the RMA program.

8*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

enrolled in these instead of RMA, which is the program of last resort. Maximum eligibility for RMA is eight

months after arrival in the United States of America.

North Carolina State will:

Base RMA on the applicant’s income and resources on the date of application. §400.102(d);

Use the 200% of poverty option as an eligibility standard for RMA.§400.101(a)(2) & §400.101(b)(2);

On the date of application, will not count cash received from the US DOS’s Reception and Placement

program, US ORR’s Match Grant or RCA Program. §400.102(c);

Will transfer clients who lose eligibility for Medicaid due to employment during the first 8 months to RMA

without an eligibility redetermination. §400.104(b);

Not consider whether a refugee has been denied or terminated from RCA as criterion for determining

eligibility for RMA. (§400.100(c)).

All other provisions of 45CFR Subpart G-Refugee Medical Assistance will be followed. Regarding

continued coverage of recipients who receive increased earnings from employment, the increased earnings

shall not affect the refugee’s continued medical assistance eligibility. The refugee continues to receive

refugee medical assistance until the end of the eight-month time-eligibility. In cases where a refugee obtains

private medical coverage, any payment of RMA for that individual must be reduced by the amount of the

third party payment.

C. UNACCOMPANIED REFUGEE CHILDREN

In accordance with Section 400.5(e) of Child Welfare Services, North Carolina will provide for the care and

supervision of, and legal responsibility for, unaccompanied refugee children in the state. The state has

developed procedures for carrying out placement and services activities under the auspices of the Child

Welfare Standards/Interstate Services Branch, NC Division of Social Services. North Carolina provides

services to Unaccompanied Refugee Children in cooperation with only licensed foster care placement

agencies. The county department of social services maintains legal custody. North Carolina assures that:

(1) Each child's placement is approved through the interstate placement mechanisms;

(2) Each child receives oversight from a county department of social services with legal authority to act in

place of the child's unavailable parent;

(3) Each child has an individual care and service plan which is implemented and which is reviewed on a

timely basis;

(4) Each child is placed in a licensed group home or approved foster care arrangement in accordance with

the child's social, health, emotional, and educational needs and available services.

Joint planning with the local departments of social services and the licensing agency is instituted. Joint

planning includes reaching agreement on the placement resource to be used, the payments and services to be

provided, and the procedures, which will be followed to establish legal responsibility for the child.

Frequently, the private agencies will suggest specific placement resources. County departments of social

services, after joint planning, petition the court for custody and provide or arrange for needed social

services. The county DSS must implement the plan and by assuming legal custody ensures the protection of

a qualified and experienced child care/placing agency. This includes placement in a licensed home or

approved caretaking arrangement.

Final approval of the placement plan and general supervision of the unaccompanied minors program in

North Carolina is the responsibility of the Child Welfare Standards/ Interstate Services Branch in the

Children's Services Section of the Division of Social Services. Staff in this unit monitor any foster care

contracts with the state and reviews the agency for licenser as a child caring institution. They review and

approve all placements, the child's service plan and provision of services, and progress of the minor.

Forms Requirements:

9*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

(1) ICPC-1OOA, Interstate Compact Placement Request (Attachment #)

The Interstate Compact is the vehicle which permits North Carolina to ensure that the child's best interests

are served before the child is placed. It should be noted that the interstate placement agreements are

terminated when the placement is consummated and legal responsibility is with the county DSS holding

legal custody. Form ICPC-1OOA will be completed by Lutheran Family Services in North Carolina and

sent to the Branch for approval of placement. The form will reflect the agreements reached with a county

DSS. North Carolina Interstate Services Branch will review the information and either approve or not

approve the placement.

(2) ICPC-1OOB, Interstate Compact Report on Child's Placement Status (Attachment #)

This document confirms initial placement with the child, a change in placement status or compact

termination.

(3) Unaccompanied Minors Progress Report ORR-4

The responsible private agency completes this form every 12 months after placement until the child is

terminated or ages out of the placement.

Pursuant to Title IV-B, Child Welfare Services, services furnished to Unaccompanied Refugee children will

be the same services which are available to other children in the same county and under the same

circumstances. Child Welfare Services may be provided to an Unaccompanied Minor child directly by

county social services staff or by purchase from private or other public providers.

D. REFUGEE SOCIAL SERVICES

Following the federal intent, North Carolina’s Refugee Social Services Program is broad in its scope and

coverage. Founded on the belief that newly arriving populations have inherent capabilities when given

opportunities, the U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) provides people in need with critical

resources to assist them in becoming integrated members of American society. ORR will provide all

necessary funds to the State of North Carolina to provide refugee-specific, culturally-sensitive social

services for all eligible recipients so that they may become self-sufficient as quickly as possible after their

arrival in the United States, up to 60 months after arrival in the United States.

Social Services Formula Grants

A wide range of services are available under this program, including employability services, case

management, English language instruction, vocational skills training, transportation, immigration assistance

(including the provision of application assistance with Employment Authorization Document (EAD) cards),

translation/interpretation, and others. As a supportive component to case management and employability,

the State of North Carolina includes service payments. Service payments are defined as payments made

directly to or on behalf of an individual recipient/client. To receive a service payment, these clients must

have an immediate or unmet need for a particular item that is essential to maintain economic self-

sufficiency, family stability, or community integration. Such items include food and shelter and/or items

necessary to obtain/maintain employment such as vocational training tuition, credential evaluation and

certification, or transportation.

Reception and Placement (R&P) services are offered to refugees through local affiliates of national

voluntary agencies (NVA) who are under contract with the U.S. Department of State. The national NVA’s

operating in North Carolina are: Church World Service (CWS), Ethiopian Community Development

Council (ECDC), Episcopal Migrant Ministries (EMM), Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, Inc. (HIAS);

Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Services (LIRS); United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

(USCCB); U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (USCRI), World Relief Corporation (WR); and

through local affiliates. All the local affiliates participate in at least one ORR-funded refugee services

program such as Preferred Communities, Matching Grant, Refugee Social Services, Targeted Assistance,

10*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

School Impact Grant, Services to Older Refugees, Cuban/Haitian Grants, or other ORR-funded programs. A

list of North Carolina’s local affiliates with their addresses is included as Attachment A. For FFY 2013, NC

expects to contract with each of the local affiliates for one or more Refugee Assistance Program (RAP)

social service.

The State considers the services required of the resettlement agency under the Cooperative Agreement and

prohibits RAP funds to be used to supplant or duplicate any R&P service provided to refugees. Instead,

RAP funds are used to supplement and expand those responsibilities. The State makes available a broad

range of social services that are allowable under the federal refugee resettlement program. These Refugee

Assistance Services are specifically designed to address those problems that are unique to the refugee’s

condition. Refugees struggle with being unable to communicate in English; of having had to flee their

homeland to escape tyranny and harm; of having traveled to a land of new people, laws and customs; and of

having to start completely anew without familiarity with the system and sometimes without any family or

friends. RAP services are provided to: Expedite the resettlement process; quickly reduce dependence on

public assistance; Assist refugees to become employed; Acquire English language skills; and ultimately

achieve self-sufficiency.

The North Carolina Social Services Commission has adopted rules that establish Refugee Assistance

Program Services as those services that are specifically defined and designated by federal regulation as

being allowable for eligible refugees under Congressional appropriations made for refugee assistance. These

services are in addition to services required for refugee unaccompanied minors and services that are

available to refugees under the State’s service plans pursuant to Title IV-B, Sections 400.5(e) and 400.110.

In accordance with 45 CFR §400.154, Refugee Assistance Program Services include:

(a.) Employment Services, including: Development of a family self-sufficiency plan and an individual

employability plan; Job orientation and employment readiness instruction; Job development;

Referral to job opportunities; Job search and interview; Job placement; and Follow-up.

(b.) Employability Assessment Services, including aptitude and skills testing.

(c.) On-The-Job (OJT) Training, when such training is provided at the employment site and is

expected to result in full-time, permanent, unsubsidized employment with the employer who is

providing the training.

(d.) English Language Instruction, with an emphasis on English as it relates to obtaining and retaining

a job.

(e.) Vocational Skills Training (VST), including driver education and training when provided as part of

an individual employability plan.

(f.) Skills Recertification, when such training meets the criteria for appropriate training in 45 CFR

§400.81(b).

(g.) Day Care for Children, when necessary for participation in an employability service or for the

acceptance or retention of employment.

(h.) Employment Transportation, when necessary for participation in an employability service or for

the acceptance or retention of employment.

(i.) Translation and Interpreter Services, when necessary for the procurement of employment or

participation in an employability service.

(j.) Case Management Services, as defined in 45 CFR §400.2, for refugees who are considered

employable under 45 CFR §400.76 and for recipients of TANF and General Assistance who are

considered employable, provided that such services are directed toward a refugee’s attainment of

employment as soon as possible after arrival in the U.S.

(k.) Assistance in Obtaining Employment Authorization Document (EAD) cards, when required as

part of an individual Employability Plan.

In accordance with 45 CFR §400.155, Other refugee services include:

11*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

(a.) Information and Referral Services, including those referrals made to/from another agency for the

provision of social services in accordance with the Service plan.

(b.) Outreach Services, including activities designed to familiarize refugees with available services, to

explain the purpose of these services, and to facilitate access to these services.

(c.) Social Adjustment services, including:

1.) Emergency Services, as follows: Assessment and short-term counseling to persons or

families in a perceived crisis; Referral to appropriate resources; and the Making of

arrangements for necessary services.

2.) Health-Related Services, as follows: Information; Referral to appropriate resources;

Assistance in scheduling appointments and obtaining services; and Counseling to individuals

or families to help them understand and identify their physical and mental health needs and

maintain or improve their physical and mental health.

3.) Home Management services, including formal or informal instruction to

individuals/families in management of household budgets, home maintenance, nutrition,

housing standards, tenants’ rights, and other consumer education services.

(d.) Transportation, when necessary for participation in a service other than an employability service.

(e.) Translation and Interpreter Services, when necessary for a purpose other than in connection with

employment or participation in an employability service.

(f.) Case Management Services, when necessary for a purpose other than in connection with

employment or participation in employability services.

(g.) Citizenship and Naturalization Preparation Services, including English Language Training and

Civics Instruction to prepare refugees for citizenship, application assistance for adjustment to Legal

Permanent Resident status and Citizenship status, assistance to disabled refugees in obtaining

disability waivers from English and civics requirements for naturalization, and the provision of

interpreter services for the citizenship interview.

(h.) School Impact Grant services, including Parent-Focused Assistance (to involve parents in their

children’s education and to engage them in school activities), After-School Activities (to support

academic performance), and In-School Services (to bridge school and the home).

(i.) Additional services, aimed at strengthening and supporting the ability of a refugee individual, family,

or refugee community to achieve and maintain economic self-sufficiency, family stability, or

community integration which has been demonstrated as effective and is not available from any other

funding source. One such service, Vocational Education Instruction (VEI) emphasizes work-

related skills so that the participant will be adequately prepared and trained for employment

opportunities.

Delivery of Services

The delivery of services under the program is made available through one of three ways: (1) The county

departments of social services (dss); (2) Private, non-profit provider agencies under financial assistance

contracts; or (3) Directly by designated staff of the state’s Refugee Office.

Priority for Refugee Services

Except for Translation/Interpreter services and Information & Referral services, eligibility for all refugee

services is limited to refugees who have been in the United States less than 60 months. Among the

population of eligible refugees, services are provided to refugees based on the following client priorities:

1.) Newly arrived refugees within their first year in the United States;

2.) Refugees receiving cash assistance;

3.) Unemployed refugees; and

4.) Employed refugees in need of services.

English Language Training (ELT)

12*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

English Language Training (ELT) is essential for successful economic sufficiency. The great majority of

refugees resettled in North Carolina will need ELT instruction. ELT instruction is given high priority by the

State Refugee Office, local affiliates, and service agencies. All refugees are offered ELT services and

strongly encouraged to participate. This instruction is given concurrently with job preparation/orientation

and employment.

The majority of formal ELT instruction in North Carolina is provided by the state’s system of local

community colleges under the umbrella of the NC Department of Community Colleges. English as a Second

Language (ESL) is a part of Basic Education throughout the 58 local community colleges. Almost all

counties in the state are served by a community college, if not within that county by a multi-county agency.

The location and number of classes as well as various levels of instruction is dependent on the community’s

number of residents for whom English is not their first language; but ESL is available at some level

throughout the state. In counties with higher numbers of foreign born residents, the ESL classes provided on

campus include day and evening times as well as multiple levels (from basic survival to advanced). Some

community colleges, with a sufficient numbers of students, are able to provide employer-based ESL at

refugees’ work-sites; as well as in neighborhood community centers where refugees live. Refugees are able

to attend tuition-free. RAP funds pay for related costs such as campus parking, books, and any class supplies

not otherwise provided. Child care and transportation necessary for adults to participate is also provided.

When it is not feasible or appropriate for a certain refugee to participate in the formal school-based classes

offered by the community college, service providers arrange alternative options to enable the refugee to

learn English. RAP funds support new arrivals schools for English learning in Guilford and Wake counties

as well as Central Piedmont Community College in Mecklenburg County, for intensive assessment and ELT

instruction for all non-English proficient refugees and asylees. When feasible, child care is provided. Small

class instruction is provided in the major resettlement communities by RAP instructors or volunteers and

(when possible) ESL instructors provided by the local community college. Sometimes, in-home tutors are

arranged for those who cannot access ELT outside the home. Refugees may be homebound due to infirmity,

age or child/elder care for dependents. Agency Volunteer Coordinators recruit, train, and supervise the

volunteers involved with providing ELT instruction. The local literacy councils also provide classes as well

as individual tutors for some refugees, as do some churches and civic groups. Attempts are made to ensure

that a variety of English language opportunities are made available to refugees which will allow them to

work, yet ensure that this important need is addressed.

Employment Services

RAP funds are primarily targeted towards the provision of employment services, which includes Pre-

Employment services, Job Development, Job Placement and Follow-Up, and Vocational Skills Training

including Driver’s Education, Vocational Education or Skills Recertification. Each year, the NC SRO

establishes an Annual Outcome Goal Plan with objectives for Entered Employment, Cash

Terminations/Reductions, Full-Time (FT) Employment Offering Health Benefits, Hourly Wage and Job

Retention. In FFY2012, NC RAP providers placed over 1,550 newcomers in jobs at an average FT wage of

$8.65 and a retention rate of 97%.

All newly-arriving refugees will be assessed for employability and all employable adults who are not

exempt will be enrolled in employment services. After assessment, the first step for employable adults is the

creation of an employability plan. In addition, a family self-sufficiency plan is developed with the refugee in

combination with an employability plan. Each employment service agency makes a concentrated effort to

prepare every employable adult for job placement through vocational training workshops and job readiness

classes. The recent economy has made preparation for work and pre-employment services critical. Job

development efforts are more essential than in years past. Many more contacts with new and different

companies are needed to secure even one job placement.

13*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

Additionally, the NC SRO has placed strategic emphasis on Vocational Education Instruction (VEI). This

instruction will focus on emphasizing vocabulary specific to work-related skills development, so that the

participant will be adequately prepared and trained for employment opportunities early on their pathway to

self-sufficiency. Employment services staff will collaborate with employers and ELT providers to

coordinate the best opportunity for client access to vocational classes where instruction will be pertinent to

the workplace and the jobs available in the area.

Equal access for women

Statistics from records of service providers reveal that women are served at nearly equal rates as men for

employment services, and exceed men in certain other services. The State emphasizes to all refugee service

providers the fact that women are not to be excluded for any refugee service which they need and for which

they are eligible, and providers apply that principle. To ensure women feel comfortable accessing services,

all RAP-funded refugee service providers employ women on staff. Periodic monitoring by the State staff

ensures that equal access for women is maintained.

Cultural Competency

The SRO emphasizes to contract providers that the agency should (whenever feasible) hire staff or secure

individuals via contract with the same cultural background and linguistic knowledge as the newly-arriving

refugees. Each agency must have a Limited English Proficiency (LEP) plan for all refugees being served,

whether services are provided by staff, paid interpreter, or community member. Community members are

often recruited to assist case managers with translation and orientation services as well as other needed

services for very small refugee groups. Provider staff is expected to become familiar with the cultural values

and customs of newly arriving refugee groups, so that they can more effectively work with that population.

Professional technical consultation is available to the refugee services provider in order to assist in planning

for service delivery, making applications for a grant or contract, maintaining on-going operations, and

conducting evaluations of program effectiveness including identification of areas of weakness and

developing corrective action plans. Frequent consultation occurs between SRO staff and refugee providers,

both on-site and over the telephone. Performance monitoring occurs monthly via desk review of Monthly

Reports of Service Delivery and expenditures.

E. Policy on services/assistance to Limited English Proficiency clients

In accordance with 400.55 and ORR State Letter 00-18, NC refugee service providers and local departments

of social services (dss) are expected to have a written plan which covers assistance options available to LEP

clients. Policies of the RCA program and client rights are made clear either by written translation or oral

interpretation in the refugee’s native language or other language he/she dictates is preferable. Critical

documents such as the Family Self Sufficiency plan will be offered in written form in both English and the

appropriate language of the refugee for large groups with the same language. Refugees who represent small

groups which are not literate will have critical program information and client rights explained to them via

interpreters or a telephonic language line. Every effort will be made to ensure that the content of the

agency’s policies is effectively communicated to each refugee.

14*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

ATTACHMENT A

NORTH CAROLINA REFUGEE SERVICE PROVIDERS

North Carolina African Services Coalition (ECDC)* – Greensboro

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS), Reception and Placement (R&P), Match Grant

(MG)

122 N. Elm Street, Suite 810 Greensboro, NC 27401

Phone # 336-574- 2677 Fax # 336-574- 2672

Agency Website: http://www.ascafrica.org 

Million Mekonnen, Director

Christine Brown, Job Developer (TAP)

Karat Berhane, Match Grant Coordinator

Phone #336-574- 2677, ext. 24 Email: million@ascafrica.org

Phone #336-574- 2677, ext. 27 Email: lena@ascafrica.org

Phone #336-574- 2677, ext. 28 Email: karat@ascafrica.org

Carolina Refugee Resettlement Agency, Inc. (HIAS)* – Charlotte

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS), Reception and Placement (R&P), Match Grant (MG)

5007 Monroe Road, Suite 101 Charlotte, NC 28205

Phone # 704-535- 8805 Fax # 704-535- 8806

Agency Website: http://www.carolinarefugee.org/

Ellen Dubin, Executive Director

Marsha Hirsch, Education Coordinator/Volunteer and Donations Coordinator

Bruce Fremderman, Bookkeeper/Office Manager

Phone # 704-535- 8805 Email: ellen.dubin@carolinarefugee.org

Phone # 704-535- 8803 Email: marsha.hirsch@carolinarefugee.org

Phone #704-535- 8803 Email: bruce.fremderman@carolinarefugee.org

Catholic Charities Diocese of Charlotte – NC Western Regional Office (Asheville)

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS)

50 Orange St. Asheville, NC 28801

Phone # 828-255- 0146 Fax # 828-253- 7339

Agency Website: http://www.ccdoc.org

Svetlana Gundorin, Refugee Case Manager

Phone # 828-255- 0146, ext. 26, or 828-275- 6630 Email: sxgundorin@charlottediocese.org

Catholic Charities Diocese of Charlotte (USCCB)*

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS), Refugee School Impact (SI), Targeted Assistance

1123 S. Church Street Charlotte, NC 28203-4003

Phone # 704-370- 3262 Fax # 704-370- 3370 or 704-370- 3377

Agency Website: http://www.ccdoc.org

Gerard A. Carter, Executive Director

Cira Ponce, Office Director

Barbara Douglas, RAP-SS Coordinator

Sheila M. Purello, Program Director (CH, SI)

15*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

Grant – Formula (TAG-F), Cuban Haitian (CH), Reception and Placement (R&P)

Phone # 704-370- 3250 Email: gacarter@charlottediocese.org

Phone # 704- 370-3277 Email: ceponce@charlottediocese.org

Phone # 704-370- 3278 Email: BADouglas@CharlotteDiocese.org

Phone # 704-370- 3294 Email: smpurello@charlottediocese.org

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

Susan Jassan, Facilitator (SI)

Phone # 704-370- 3258 Email: spjassan@charlottediocese.org

Central Piedmont Community College – Charlotte

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS)

P.O. Box 35009 Charlotte, NC 28235

Phone # 704-330- 4855 Fax # 704-330- 4821

Agency Website: http://www.cpcc.edu/

Marianne Lyall-Knusel, Senior Coordinator

Amanda Ingrassia, Recruitment, Retention, and Assessment Specialist

Phone # 704-330- 4855 Email: marianne.lyall.knusel@cpcc.edu

Phone # 704-769- 0299 Email: Amanda.ingrassia@cpcc.edu

Charlotte Mecklenburg Senior Center – Charlotte

Grants: RAP – Elderly (RAP-E)

3925 Willard Farrow Drive Charlotte, NC 28215

Phone # 704-531- 6900 (Main Line Connects to All) Fax # 704-531- 6008

Agency Website: http://www.cmseniorcenters.org/

Myra Green, Senior Center Director Email: shamrockdirector@cmseniorcenters.org

Mirian González, Refugee Assistant Email: shamrock1assist@cmseniorcenters.org

Church World Service (CWS)* – Durham

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS), Targeted Assistance Grant – Discretionary (TAG-

D), Reception and Placement (R&P), Match Grant (MG), Preferred Communities Grant

(PCG)

112 S. Duke Street, Suite 4B Durham, NC 27701

Phone # 919-680- 4310 (Main Line Connects to All) Fax # 919-680- 4320

Agency Website: http://www.cwsrdu.org

Ellen Andrews, Director, Refugee and Immigration Program Email:

eandrews@cwsglobal.org

Rebecca Schaeffer, Immigration Services Coordinator Email:

rschaeffer@cwsglobal.org

Erin Edmiston, Employment Specialist (MG, TAG-D) Email:

eedmiston@cwsglobal.org

Mandy Maring, Employment Specialist Email:

mmaring@cwsglobal.org

 

Church World Service (CWS)* – Greensboro

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS), Reception and Placement (R&P), Match Grant

(MG), Preferred Communities (PCG), USCIS Citizenship Grant

620 S. Elm St., Suite 315 Greensboro, NC 27406

Phone # 336-617- 0381 (Main Line Connects to All) Fax # 336-617- 0654

Agency Website: http://cwsgreensboro.org/

Sarah Ivory, Director Email: sivory@cwsglobal.org

Valerie Coll, Lead Employment Specialist Email: vcoll@cwsglobal.org

Darius Crawford, MG Employment Specialist Email: dcrawford@cwsglobal.org

Badal Gurung, Case Manager Email: bgurung@cwsglobal.org

16*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

Losko Renic, Case Manager Email: lrenic@cwsglobal.org

Margaret Evans, Refugee Special Cases Coordinator Email:

mmevans@cwsglobal.org

Kelly Dent, R&P Coordinator Email: kdent@cwsglobal.org

Stephanie Adams, Citizenship Education Coordinator Email: sadams@cwsglobal.org

Katlyn Lantz, Immigration Counselor Email: klantz@cwsglobal.org

Simon Taft, Esq., Immigration Legal Services

Phone # 336-676- 4223 Email: staft@cwsglobal.org

Cross Cultural Resources, Inc. – Charlotte

Grants: Targeted Assistance Grant – Formula (TAG-F)

4801 E. Independence Drive, Ste. 608 Charlotte, North Carolina 28212

Phone # 704-469- 5638 Fax # 704-208- 4018

Agency Website: http://www.ccrlanguages.com/

Abdullah Sheikh, Executive Director Email: Abdullah@ccrlanguages.com

Elon University School of Law, Humanitarian Immigration Law Clinic – Greensboro

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS)

Physical Address: 210 W. Friendly Avenue; Greensboro, NC 27401

Mailing Address: Humanitarian Immigration Law Clinic; P.O. Box 5848; Greensboro, NC

27435

Phone # 336-279- 9299 Fax # 336-272- 9667

Agency Website: http://www.elon.edu/e-web/law/academics/Immigration%20Clinic.xhtml

Heather Scavone, Director

Phone # 336-279- 9354 Email: hscavone@elon.edu

Guilford County Schools – Greensboro

Grants: none

120 Franklin Blvd. Greensboro, NC 27401

Phone # 336-370- 8982 Fax # 336-370- 8939

Website: http://gcsnc.com

Mayra Hayes, Director of Guilford County School District, English-As- A Second Language

Program

Millie Barreto, ESL Community Liaison

Email: hayesm2@gcsnc.com

Email: barretm@gcsnc.com

Interfaith Refugee Ministry (EMM)*– New Bern

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS), Targeted Assistance Grant – Discretionary (TAG-

1233 Colony Drive New Bern, NC 28562

Phone # 252-633- 9009 Fax # 252-638- 7570

Agency Website: http://www.helpingrefugees.org

Susan Husson, Executive Director

Vesna Dujmusic, Finance Manager

Zo Than Pari, Case Management Coordinator

17*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

D), Reception and Placement (R&P), Match Grant (MG)

Phone # 252-633- 9009 Email: shusson@helpingrefugees.org

Phone # 252-633- 9009 Email: vdujmusic@helpingrefugees.org

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

Debi Miller, Case Worker/MG Coordinator

Phone # 252-636- 1759 Email: zpari@helpingrefugees.org

Phone # 252-638- 8705 Email: dmiller@helpingrefugees.org

Interfaith Refugee Ministry-Wilmington (EMM)*– Wilmington

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS), Reception and Placement (R&P), Match Grant

(MG)

610-A South College Road Wilmington, NC  28403

Phone # 910-264- 7244 Fax # 910-769- 3907

Agency Website: http://www.helpingrefugees.org

Sara Pascal, Sub-Office Coordinator

Gail Ferris, Case Manager

Danielle Allen, Employment/Resource Developer

Tun Tun, Case Worker

Phone # 910-264- 7244 Email: spascal@helpingrefugees.org 

Phone # 910-262- 9971 Email: gferris@helpingrefugees.org

Phone # 910-538- 0714 Email: dallen@helpingrefugees.org

Phone # 910-264- 0622 Email: ttun@helpingrefugees.org

International House – Charlotte

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS)

Physical Address: 1817 Central Avenue, Ste. 215 Charlotte, NC 28205

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5429 Charlotte, NC 28299-5429

Phone # 704-405- 0962 (Legal Clinic Direct Line) Fax # 704-334- 2423

Agency Website:  http://www.ihclt.org

Jelena Giric-Held, Clinic Director, BIA-Accredited Representative (Ext. 113) Email:

jheld@ihclt.org

Jacqueline Berry, BIA-Accredited Representative (Ext. 118) Email:

jberry@ihclt.org

Anne L. Crotty, Supervising Attorney (Ext. 115) Email:

acrotty@ihclt.org

Kathleen Brennan, Attorney (Ext. 114) Email:

Kbrennan@ihclt.org

Lutheran Services Carolinas – Child & Family Services – Refugee Resettlement Services (LIRS)* –

Raleigh

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS), Reception and Placement (R&P), Match Grant

616 Hutton St. Raleigh, NC 27606

Phone # 919-832- 2620 Fax # 919-832- 9876

Agency website: http://www.LSCarolinas.net

Courtney McCurdy, Area Manager

Edward Ruse, Vocational Education Training

Bedrija Jazic, Director (Lutheran Services Carolinas – NC and SC)

(MG), LIRS Children’s Services

Phone # 919-861- 2812 Email: CMccurdy@lscarolinas.net

Phone # 919-861- 2873 Email: eruse@lscarolinas.net

Phone # 803-461- 2637 Email: bjazic@lscarolinas.net

18*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

Montagnard/Dega Association, Inc. – Greensboro

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS)

611 Summit Ave., Suite 10 Greensboro, NC 27405

Phone # 336-373- 1812 Fax # 336-373- 1832

Agency Website: https://sites.google.com/site/mdagreensboronc/

Y’Siu Hlong, Executive Director Email: mda-hlong@triad.rr.com

Stephanie Cheston, Senior Employment Specialist

Bridget Kennedy Beck, Administrative Coordinator

Phone # 336-373- 1812 Email: Stephanie@mda-greensboro.org

Phone # 336-373- 1812 Email: Bridget@mda-greensboro.org

New Arrivals Institute – Greensboro

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS)

New Arrival School: 2714 West Market St., Greensboro, NC 27403

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5315, Greensboro, NC 27435-0315

Phone # 336-937- 4701

Agency Website: https://sites.google.com/site/newarrivalsinstitute/home

Leilani Roughton, Executive Director

Lynn Thompson, Refugee Education Assistant/Outreach Director

Chad Camp, Vocational Education Instructor

Email: lroughton@newarrivalsinstitute.com

Email: lthompson@newarrivalsinstitute.com

Email: ccamp@newarrivalsinstitute.com

Senior Resources of Guilford – Greensboro

Grants: RAP – Elderly (RAP-E)

PO Box 21993, 301 East Washington Street Greensboro, NC 27401-27420

Phone # 336-373- 4816 Fax # 336-373- 4922

Agency Website: http://www.senior-resources- guilford.org/

Ellen D. Whitlock, Executive Director

Renee Griffin, Asst. Director Email: programs@senior-resources-

guilford.org

Narayan Khadka, Refugee Outreach Coordinator Email: refugeepgm@senior-resources-

guilford.org

U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (USCRI)* – Raleigh

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS), Cuban-Haitian (CH), Targeted Assistance Grant –

Discretionary (TAG-D), Reception and Placement (R&P), Match Grant (MG),

Preferred Communities (PCG), Post Release Services, ORR Micro-Enterprise Grant,

Refugee Saving Program Individual Development Accounts (IDA)

The Raleigh Building; 5 West Hargett Street, Suite 202 Raleigh, NC 27601

Phone # 919-334- 0072 (Main Number) Fax # 919-334- 0077

Agency Website: http://www.refugees.org/about-us/where- we-work/north- carolina/

Kevin Noonan, Director, NC Field Office (Ext. 4016) Email: knoonan@uscrinc.org

Saida Mohamed, Job Developer (RAP-SS) (Ext. 4008) Email: smohamed@uscrinc.org

Dawn Nicolas-Roberts, Program Coordinator (CH) (Ext. 4004) Email: droberts@uscrinc.org

Wake Technical Community College – Raleigh

19*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

North Carolina State Refugee Plan 2015

Grants: RAP-Social Services (RAP-SS)

9101 Fayetteville Road Raleigh, NC 27603-5655

Phone # 919-334- 1516 Fax # 919-715- 3437

Agency Website: http://www.waketech.edu/

Susan O’Neill, Recruiter/Retention/Transition Specialist Email: smoneill@waketech.edu

World Relief Refugee Services of North Carolina (WR)* – High Point

Grants: RAP – Social Services (RAP-SS), Targeted Assistance Grant – Formula (TAG-F),

Reception and Placement (R&P), Match Grant (MG), Anti-Human Trafficking

Program (AHT)

155 Northpoint Avenue, Suite 102 High Point, NC 27262

Phone # 336-887- 9007 (Main Line Connects to All) Fax # 336-887- 5245

Agency Website: http://worldrelief.org/highpoint

Andrew Timbie, Director Email: atimbie@wr.org

Kristin Boggs, Finance Manager Email: Kboggs@wr.org

Jennifer Foy, Employment Services Manager (RAP-SS Contact) Email: jfoy@wr.org

Shameda Evans, Resettlement Manager (R&P) Email: Sevans@wr.org

Sandy Paige, MG Coordinator Email: Spaige@wr.org

Rachel Parker, AHT Client Advocate Email: Rparker@wr.org

North Carolina State Refugee Office

Name Telephone Number E-Mail

Marlene S. Myers, NC State Refugee Coordinator 919-527- 6304 Marlene.Myers@dhhs.nc.gov

Gail Andersen, Consultant 919-527- 6302 Gail.AndersEn@dhhs.nc.gov

Lynne Little, Consultant 919-527- 6303 Lynne.Little@dhhs.nc.gov

Patricia Priest, Consultant 919-527- 6305 Patricia.Priest@dhhs.nc.gov

Min Jung Jung, Consultant 919-527- 6334 mjung.jung@dhhs.nc.gov

DSS Main Number: 919-527- 6300

Fax Number: 919-334- 1265

Website: http://www.ncdhhs.gov/dss/refugee/

Physical Address: (Use this if sending package by commercial carrier- FedEx, etc.)

Department of Health and Human Services

NC Refugee Program

McBryde Building / Hargrove Wing/Dix Campus

820 S. Boylan Avenue

Raleigh, NC 27603

US Postal Service Mailing Address:

20*These agencies are local affiliates of one of the National Voluntary Agencies who have an agreement with the U.S. Department of State

for Initial Reception and Placement of Refugees.

Department of Health and Human Services

Family and Economic Services/NC Refugee Program

Hargrove Building/ Dix Campus

MSC 2405

Raleigh, NC 27699-2405

NC Refugee Health Program, NC DHHS / Division of Public Health

North Carolina Refugee Health Coordinator Telephone Number E-Mail

Jennifer Reed Morillo 919-733- 7286 ext. 112 jennifer.morillo@dhhs.nc.gov

Confidential Fax Number: 919-733- 0084

Physical Address: (Use this if sending package by commercial carrier- FedEx, etc.)

1200 Front Street, Suite 101

Raleigh, NC  27609

US Postal Service Mailing Address:

NC Refugee Health Program

1905 MSC

Raleigh, NC  27699-1905